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David A. West

Senior Internet Consultant & Professional Speaker

Canadian Social Media Advisor & Search Engine Strategist

403-456-0089

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David West

Does Getting Older Have to Mean Getting OutofTouch With Technology?

Tuesday, July 15th, 2014

From time to time, I speak about technology at an association event and hear an audience member say that technology is just harder for older people to learn. They don’t always use that exact wording, but the message is clear: The latest gadgets and apps are really aimed at young people.

To me, that isn’t just wrong, it’s a huge misconception. For one thing, I know for a fact that older people can become comfortable with technology (and even design or improve it). And for another, why should those of us who are over 40 let our kids and grandkids have all the fun?

The fact of the matter is that anyone can learn to use technology well, if only they have a real desire to master the fundamentals. Older people aren’t worse at technology; they’re sometimes just better at being stubborn.

If you fall into that category, here are a few things to keep in mind:

Learning technology is just a matter of time and effort. Using a smartphone, for example, is a little bit like riding a bike – cumbersome at first, but easier with practice. Eventually, using virtually any piece of technology becomes second nature with a little bit of practice and patience.

You can probably afford better technology than your younger friends or family members. One of the perks of getting older is that you tend to have a little more disposable income. That means, if you’re truly committed to getting the most from technology, you can probably afford something that’s sleek, stylish, and useful.

And, older people can often put technology to its best use. While the kids you know are using apps to tend to imaginary farms, you could use technology for scheduling events, paying bills, or researching a lifelong passion.

Still not sure you can face the latest phone or app? Maybe now is a perfect time to book David West as a technology speaker for your next event. Contact us today to find out about rates and scheduling.

3 Keys to Mastering Any New Gadget or Software

Monday, June 30th, 2014

When I speak at conferences and events, one of the things I hear most often is that lots of people would love to get more from the technology they use, but they just can’t seem to find the time or patience to master new gadgets and software.

Fortunately, the process of becoming fluent with a new tool you need for your business doesn’t have to be complicated. You just have to follow three simple steps:

1. Start small. Don’t try to master everything all at once. Unless you’re already very familiar with a piece of technology, or a very fast and patient learner, you’re likely to become overwhelmed and frustrated. Instead, devote a little bit of time (like 15 minutes a day) to picking up new techniques. You’ll be amazed at how quickly your new skills will add up.

2. Learn the basics. One mistake people make with technology is trying to jump into the features they want to use right away before understanding the basics. Whether it’s a new smartphone, an application, or something else, make sure you can navigate your way through the interface and understand the basics before you move on to advanced topics.

3. Customize the tools you use. One secret to using technology like a pro is to customize everything. From your interfaces and home screens to macros and shortcuts, customization prevents you from having to follow the same time-consuming steps again and again. Once you’re sure you know how to use your new technology, get it to work for you by customizing as much as possible.

Need an Internet marketing consultant or technology speaker for your next event? Call David West today to learn about topics, speaking fees, and available dates.

By David A. West 

What Will Internet Marketing Look Like in Another 10 Years?

Tuesday, June 17th, 2014

Because I frequently speak to business groups and associations throughout Alberta, I hear different versions of this question on a pretty regular basis. Unfortunately, there isn’t a specific answer I can give.

To understand why, consider that many of the Internet marketing tools we take for granted today – like Twitter and LinkedIn, for example – were virtually unknown 10 years ago. There are probably new ideas and technologies that are changing the game right now, but it will be a while before most of us are aware of them, myself included.

Still, there are a few firm predictions I can make, even without the benefit of insider knowledge or a crystal ball. Here are a handful of educated guesses about the most important Internet marketing trends coming our way in the next decade:

1. Everything is getting more social. People trust each other more than they do marketers, which is one of the reasons social media sites are so powerful and important in the first place. Finding followers and getting positive reviews is going to carry even more weight as time goes on.

2. Internet marketing will be faster. We are already reaching blazing broadband and wireless speeds, but you can expect things like page loading times, search times, and application loading times to keep being emphasized in the future. People love the web, and they love finding what they’re looking for quickly.

3. Markets and opportunities are going to be tighter than before. Already, Google and the other search engines are making search results more personalized, and searchers themselves are using longer phrases to locate exactly what they want amid a sea of information. Expect that most companies will “tighten up” their marketing to focus on smaller, more specific groups of buyers.

Do you feel ready for the future of Internet marketing? Why not have David West speak to your group and show you what kinds of things your audience could be doing today to better prepare for tomorrow’s opportunities?

By David A. West 

Some of David's Clients

  • Cir Realty
  • Canada Mortgage Network
  • Canasa
  • Calgary Residential